How we work at different scales for greater impact

Driving better health takes changing not just what happens in our neighbourhoods, but also across our boroughs, nationally and even internationally.

We work at different scales – from projects in small neighbourhoods all the way to international collaborations. The nature of the change we want to see locally and the types of interventions that will help achieve it guides our approach to our programmes.


For example, to support residents in Walworth, we back our partners to co-design and run initiatives in the local area – including creating physical spaces for people to meet others and get support. But if we want to improve the quality and availability of food in our local supermarkets and convenience stores for example, we need to change policy and practice at a borough, national and even international level.

In our place-based approach through our programmes, we operate at five different scales.

Neighbourhood

This is our hyper-local work – it involves us growing partnerships and layering different initiatives within a small geography, sometimes covering just a handful of streets.

It means building a deep understanding of the communities living in that area. Our Neighbourhood Schemes are prime examples of this. We currently run four schemes and we plan to expand into more neighbourhoods in 2019.

Neighbourhood Schemes

Our hyper-local Neighbourhood Schemes bring together professionals, volunteers and communities across local NHS, government, charities, businesses and more. Today, we have active Neighbourhood Schemes in Faraday, North Lambeth, Waterloo and Walworth.

Borough

 The health issues we focus on often mean we need to look at practice and policy driven by statutory bodies and others in our boroughs.

This is why we've supported the development of a social prescribing network in Southwark, to join up and boost the provision of activities beyond medical care which can improve people’s health, like sports or social clubs.

Sometimes, for a new idea to be viable and well-evidenced, it may need to happen at a larger scale than a neighbourhood. With The Consumer Goods Forum, we’re testing ways to move consumers towards healthier shopping baskets by working with retailers responsible for over 200 grocery stores across Lambeth and Southwark.

Retailers collaborate for better health in South London

 We’re working with international consortium  The Consumer Goods Forum  to introduce its health and wellness initiative,  Collaboration for Healthier Lives, for the first time in the UK.

The ambitious collaboration brings together some of the largest retailers including Tesco and Sainsbury’s to test ways to move consumers in Lambeth and Southwark towards healthier shopping baskets. This includes promotions on fruit and veg, as well as encouraging people to swap products high in fat or sugar for healthier alternatives.

City

 At times, the key to unlocking positive change in health in our boroughs may rest with the Mayor or depend on efforts that need to happen city-wide.

For example, responsibility for some environments that impact people’s health – like the transport network – often sits with the city’s authority, in our case, Greater London Authority.

This is partly why we helped start London's Child Obesity Taskforce – an effort to ensure the city and its spaces support children to have a healthy weight.

Driving action on obesity across the city

 Driven by the  Greater London Authority , we are proud to be lead partner on London's Child Obesity Taskforce, a multi-sector collaboration.

We back its aspiration that by 2030 there's a radical difference in how we live in the capital – having shifted norms and attitudes to diet, activity and weight – so that every child in London has opportunities to enjoy a healthy weight.

National

  Real progress on local health can also require change at a national level, for example through policy coming from
central government or with the NHS.

By collaborating with the UK's largest medical charities and
Royal College of General Practitioners, we're contributing to national discussions and decision-making which impacts
the healthcare that people with multiple conditions experience in our boroughs.

Sometimes, all of us need to look at an issue differently for meaningful change to happen. With that in mind, we're working to shift how people think about childhood obesity to focus on the right solutions for impact.

National

  Real progress on local
health can also require change
at a national level, for example
through policy coming from
central government or
with the NHS.

By collaborating with the UK's
largest medical charities and
Royal College of General Practitioners,
we're contributing to national
discussions and decision-making
which impacts the healthcare
that people with multiple conditions
experience in our boroughs.

Sometimes, all of us need
to look at an issue differently for
meaningful change to happen.
With that in mind, we're working to
shift how people think about childhood
obesity to focus on the right
solutions for impact.

Reframing how we view childhood obesity

    There's a clear story in the public's mind on childhood obesity: it's about individuals, not enough willpower and parents making bad choices.

However, this narrative overlooks that what we eat is often an unconscious response to cues in our environment. With the Frameworks Institute, we're exploring deeply held beliefs
about childhood obesity in the UK and testing new messages to get professionals, decision-makers and the wider public thinking about the issue differently.

International

  Carving out a meaningful space for a health issue
or approach locally can also need the energy and
influence of organisations or systems that span well
beyond our national borders.

That's why we're partnering with charity ShareAction,
encouraging investors to put pressure on large and
multinational food and drink companies who could
change practices that contribute to childhood obesity.

International

  Carving out a meaningful space
for a health issue or approach
locally can also need the energy
and influence of organisations or
systems that span well
beyond our national borders.

That's why we're partnering with
charity ShareAction, encouraging
investors to put pressure on large
and multinational food and
drink companies who could
change practices that contribute
to childhood obesity.

Investor action to reduce sugar consumption

   For over a decade, ShareAction has been building
a movement for responsible investment in the UK and
around the world.

We’re excited to work with them to activate investors
to encourage health-promoting practices by food
and drinks manufacturers and retailers whose products
make up lots of what's available in local stores.
With a focus on sugary products, our Healthy Markets
initiative looks to unlock the power of investors to 
help  improve practices – from formulation
to marketing at children.

Investor action to reduce sugar consumption

   For over a decade, ShareAction
has been building a movement for
responsible investment in the
UK and around the world.

We’re excited to work with
them to activate investors to
encourage health-promoting
practices by food and
drinks manufacturers and retailers
whose products make up lots
of what's available in local stores.
With a focus on sugary products,
our Healthy Markets initiative looks
to unlock the power of investors to
help  improve practices –
from formulation to
marketing at children.

Working at different scales – from a handful of local streets to initiatives with global reach – allows us to help drive the multiple and interconnected changes needed to create better health.

Combined with how we collaborate and how we use knowledge, this underpins our place-based approach.